"Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." -Vince Lombardi

Do you like to secure victory over your opponent no matter who he/she is? Does the thrill of winning a match or game bring you unparalleled contentment? If so, you're not alone!

The sensation of winning is scientifically proven to make a person feel happier. How's that? Well, after winning something, testosterone increases which activates the chemical messenger and increases dopamine. In turn, dopamine hits the brain's reward network, which causes a person to feel much better about themselves.

However, it's important to state that while winning is much more highly favoured than losing, sometimes we have to accept losses. One good thing about when we fail is that we hate the feeling that we are experiencing so much that we will do everything we can to ensure victory the next.

Preparing yourself to win sets you up for victory no matter which discipline, activity, or sport you participate in. 

As for chess, making sure that you win is done through diligent study of the rules. So, we shall examine how chess players can win matches in four, three, and two movements on the board without further ado.

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Moving Chess Pieces: Knowing How Each Piece is Allowed to Move

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Each chess piece has a specific way that it moves. It is essential to know more about it before playing matches. (Source: Unsplash)

Before beginners know what it takes to win a game with only three or four movements, it is necessary that amateur players recognise the value of each chess piece and how they move across the board. Knowing how chess pieces move is part of the fundamentals of the game, and without memorising this fact, you will not be able to learn more experienced aspects of chess.

So without further ado, we shall consider how each of the six distinct chess pieces moves in their unique ways.

King

The king is a powerful chess piece that can either move one square in any direction or complete a unique movement known as castling.

Queen

Probably the most powerful of all pieces, the queen can move diagonally, horizontally, or vertically any number of squares. It's important to state that queens cannot jump over any other piece.

Rooks

There are four rooks on a standard chessboard, and they move horizontally and vertically any number of squares. They are unable to jump over any other piece, and they move once the king castles.

Bishops

There are four bishops on the chessboard, and they have the function of moving diagonally any number of squares. However, similar to other pieces, they cannot jump over other pieces while in movement.

Knights

Knights move strangely in comparison to other pieces, and they have the power to move in an "L" shape across the board. The "L" would be two squares horizontally and one square vertically. Thus, in comparison to the other chess pieces, knights are the only pieces that can jump over others.

Pawns

On a chessboard, there is the most amount of pawns with a lot of 16. Pawns move vertically one square with the option of moving forward two squares if they have not yet done so. Pawns capture differently than other pieces and are unable to move backward on captures or moves. Pawns are allowed to complete a move that is known in chess as En Passant. 

There you have it, folks, the specific ways each chess pieces moves on the board. Now that you know how each piece progresses, the next step is memorising the combinations of movements to win matches against opponents.

Guaranteeing Victory in Four Chess Movements

the places of pieces
When playing as a beginner, many will notice that the chessboard has numbers and letters to help guide a new player throughout the board. (Source: Unsplash)

When learning how to play chess, many resources and websites help beginners learn how to complete a chess game. Also, when learning chess, many players erroneously believe that to win a match against an opponent, hours and hours with plenty of moves are required; that couldn't be farther from the truth!

Did you know that's it's possible to win a chess match in only four moves? The four-move checkmate has been called the Scholar's Mate by many experts of the game. The Scholar's Mate is by far one of the most common ways to end a chess game.

It is estimated that most chess players have fallen for or delivered a checkmate using The Scholar's Mate at least once in their life. 

The Scholar's Mate is completed by taking into consideration the following steps:

  1. White opens by advancing 1.e2-e4,
  2. White develops the bishop to c4 to attack the f7 pawn,
  3. White extends the queen to h5,
  4. If black does not defend its position, white checkmates with 4.Qxf7 and the game is finished.

Black can defend itself in several ways against The Scholar's Mate; however, if they do not, white wins the match with a checkmate, and the game was played in only four moves.

By the way, if you didn't understand what the numbers and letters were in the previously mentioned list, it is essential to state that they refer to the position a piece goes on a chessboard to keep it well-organised and well-understood for beginners.

Now, is it possible to win a chess game in only three movements, or is that too far of a stretch? Keep on reading to find out more!

Winning a Chess Match in Three Moves

knocking down the competition
Did you know that it's possible to get checkmate with only three moves? (Source: Unsplash)

Before trying it with a friend at home or online, it is necessary first to see if it is possible to win a chess game in only three moves. So, is it? The answer is YES!

Although maybe a little less known than the four move checkmate, there is the possibility to win a chess match in only three movements. You can achieve a three-movement checkmate with or without capturing; the choice is yours!

It is essential to state that to win in only three moves; your chess opponent is almost sleeping or utterly unaware of what is happening around him/her! However, if you have the ability and the finesse to pull it off, winning a chess match in only three moves is a beautiful feeling.

Let's examine how chess players can achieve a three-movement chess match with and without capturing.

With Capturing

To work towards getting a checkmate in only three moves while at the same time capturing the opponent's pieces, the following steps must be followed to guarantee success:

  1. Move the King Pawn Forward: in front of the king is a pawn and the first thing you want to do is move that pawn forward two spaces to square e4. This first move opens up the way for the queen to move diagonally and for the opponent to expose their queen.
  2. Capture the Competitor's Pawn: use your pawn to capture your opponent's advanced pawn at f5. By doing this, you are trying to encourage your opponent to move his knight forward two spaces to g5; it wouldn't be wise for your opponent to do so, but they might fall for this trick!
  3. Move the White Queen Forward: you've finally reached the point of checkmate by moving your queen on the diagonal to h5, and you have your competitor's king trapped. Call out checkmate to claim the game and taste sweet victory!

No Capturing

The second method to win a chess game in three movements is through no capturing. Though it slightly differs from the technique that involves capturing, the no capturing way can be accomplished using problem-solving skills, planning, and hoping that your opponent doesn't know what they are doing.

The following are the steps necessary to win a chess match in three moves without capturing:

  1. Move Queen: the first part is completed by moving the queen pawn ahead to d3. The goal is to get your competitor's bishop and knight pawns forward, which will allow the queen to move onto h5. If you successfully tempt the opponent, the result will be victorious!
  2. Move the King Pawn: the next movement involves moving the king to ensure that the queen is freed up and can be in a checkmate position. The king needs to be moved to e4 so that the queen can reach h5.
  3. Checkmate: by having moved the queen forward to h5, you've trapped your opponent's king in the same place as you would have done with capturing; however, this time, no capturing had to be done!

Much of the success of getting a checkmate against your opponent after only three movements rides on the fact of hoping that your competitor will be oblivious to your moves and what you're doing on the chessboard.

It's important to state that some experienced chess players have won games with only two moves on the board; now that's talent!

In conclusion, whether you win a chess game in three moves or many others, it's essential to have fun and possess a love for the game.

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Shana

A South African in France who loves to travel and discover new cultures, is passionate about photography, and who is happiest near the ocean.